Nicole • September 23, 2012

Thanks to Mariana, I’ve added some scans of a couple of Saturday’s newspaper magazines and the article from Doctor Who Magazine #452 (I’ve added them only for those who can’t buy the magazine, but if you can please do!)!

Magazine Scans > Doctor Who Magazine #452 (November 2012) [+3]
Magazine Scans > We Love TV (22-28 September 2012) [+3]
Magazine Scans > Saturday Daily Express (22 Septmber) [+3]

Nicole • September 23, 2012

Jenna Louise Coleman is of course hot TV property right now, given that she’s taken on the role of new Doctor Who companion Clara Oswin

We have of course already briefly met Clara during the show’s new series debut episode, but she becomes the Doctor’s sidekick full-time in the Christmas episode.

However, during an interview with the Daily Mirror, Jenna, who shot to fame as lesbian teen Jasmine Thomas in Emmerdale, has revealed that there have been times when she’s wondered if she’d ever truly “make it” in the world of show business.

But of course, since her Emmerdale days – and as well as her Doctor Who role – Jenna has starred in ITV’s blockbuster Titanic, the BBC’s soap Waterloo Road, and she’s also currently starring in an adaptation of John Braine’s 1950s tale, Room At The Top.

Of her acting career, Jenna told the Mirror, “I’ve come to realise there’s no rhyme nor reason… It’s not been easy. I’ve had to be very patient, and I haven’t done a lot of things that have been offered to me because they just didn’t feel right. I’ve done a lot of voice overs – like the DFS advert – and video games. And when I’m not working, I do a lot of yoga.”

And of her role in Room At The Top, in which she plays Susan Brown, Jenna said, “Room At The Top is about class, love, lust, sex, ambition, control and money… Susan Brown [is] the daughter of the richest man in Warley. Susan is a very innocent young girl, but she’s also quite spoilt. She’s only 19, yet doesn’t know her identity.” Moving on to her role on Emmerdale, Jenna said, “I thank my lucky stars I started off in this industry with such a fantastic break.”

She added, “Leaving Emmerdale was a risk, but I just hoped to get more work.”

Next, while discussing playing Doctor Who character Clara, Jenna said, “I’m looking forward to big adventures. There’s no limit to what they do with the stories and where in time we can go. I’m so excited.” And finally, of working with , who of course plays the Doctor, Jenna said, “Matt is so full of energy, which is infectious. Me joining him will be a new dynamic for the show and we’ll be working hard to make that work.”

(source)

Nicole • September 11, 2012

I’ve update the media page, adding some icons, animations and a new section: drawings! Where you can find drawings by the very talented Heath Ziegenfusz, that he kindly donate to Jenna-Louise Coleman Online.

Nicole • September 11, 2012

Added a newspaper scan (thanks to Helen) and a couple of new promos of Room at the Top in the gallery!

Magazine Scans > Daily Mail (03 September 2012) [+1]
Film Productions > 2010: Room at the Top > Promos [+2]

Nicole • September 03, 2012

“We are going to do the story properly of the Doctor having lost a friend and making a new one. We’re not taking that lightly. It’s not in one door out the other. It’s the story of how all that affects him, why he engages with somebody else and what’s going on with that – that’s all important.

What does Jenna bring to it? It’s surprising just how much the show changes with a new co-star. The Doctor is quite different with her, and the way you watch them is quite different. You watched the Eleventh Doctor and Amy arrive together. It’s like they grew up in the same sandpit, playing. They felt not quite like equals – the Doctor never feels like an equal to his companion – but you knew them equally well and they were equally important to each other. They formed around each other. And one of the interesting things about writing the Doctor is that he’s so responsive to the people around him. It’s almost like left on his own his personality would slowly disintegrate. He becomes what people want him to be, a little bit. So he’s Amy’s Raggedy Doctor.

With a different companion he becomes a slightly different man. He dresses differently. The mere fact that he’s so much taller than her suddenly reveals that Matt Smith is very tall, not, as people assume, about average height, because he was about the same height as Karen. He’s the senior man, not in the sense that he’s more important but he’s the one you know already, and he’s training up a new one, as it were. In these five episodes the Doctor is practically the adopted son of Amy and Rory. He’s gone from being the wonderful man from space – Space Gandalf, as he wants to be – to being that troublesome kid that they try and keep under control. They even talked about getting babysitters for him in one unfortunately cut scene. They love him, but they know he’s a big kid, they know they have to look out for him, check he eats and all that. Whereas with the new companion he’s back to being the mysterious spacefarer.

And this never goes away, this thrill – you want to see the reaction when you see it’s bigger on the inside, you want to see the count the hearts moment, you want the story to begin again. And that’s what it gives you. It gives you Doctor Who at its most iconic, because a new person is having to learn the rules – and you’ve seen that story how many times now? I don’t think you ever get tired of it.”

(source)