Archive for the ‘Press Archive’ Category
Nicole • September 25, 2015

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY – One of the most high-profile small-screen acting gigs opened up last week with the announcement by Jenna Coleman that she is leaving the long-running time travel show Doctor Who, on which she played the semi-titular Time Lord’s adventuring companion, Clara Oswald. But the actress says she has no idea about the identity of her replacement – or replacements. “No, I know nothing, absolutely nothing,” Coleman told EW last weekend. “Once you’re out, you’re out!”

On the other hand, Coleman was able to provide an at least partial list of the items she, let us say, permanently borrowed from the Doctor Who set before her departure. “Toward my last couple of weeks, I had my eyes peeled,” she said. “So, yeah, I’ve taken my key – I still have a key to the TARDIS! I have something else which I’m going to reveal afterwards, perhaps, because I don’t think they know it’s missing yet. [Laughs] And I also took a clockwork squirrel.”

Well, everybody needs a clockwork squirrel. “Exactly!” (source)

Nicole • September 23, 2015

Jenna for 1883 Magazine

1883 MAGAZINE – Jenna Coleman is the actress of the moment – in demand, in the papers and about to burst back onto our screens in a brand new series of Doctor Who.

Treading the boards since she was 19, she bagged her first TV role before even auditioning for drama school, and hasn’t looked back since with leading roles in Emmerdale and Doctor Who, plus a Hollywood superhero film to boot.

With a brand new TV project playing the 18-year-old Queen Victoria about to go into production, I grabbed her during a rare break from work to chat about new skills, Matt Smith’s funny walk and why if Jenna has her way HRH Queen Victoria may well be a paragliding monarch…

Doctor Who is a bit of a British institution isn’t it? Has playing Clara totally changed your life?
Yes, in ways you wouldn’t expect. My personal life has changed, but it’s what you end up doing on a day-to-day basis that’s really different. The imaginative nature of the storytelling becomes your reality – green screens, running away from monsters and being put on wires and hung upside down. I’ve kind of entered an alternative universe, every time I come back to London I’m hit by reality!

So how did you get started as an actress?
I did loads of plays at school, and started to dance when I was really young – but I gave that up when I was about 16 as I realised I wanted to act. I was involved with a theatre company, and we used to travel up to the Edinburgh Fringe Festival and put on loads of plays and perform as much as we could.

Did you have a plan B?
When I was younger I thought I might like to be a casting director because I love to read and imagine who would be good playing each role. Plus I’d get to watch loads of films and theatre and use it as research. I think now as a plan B I’d like to do something that you can be commissioned to do – like a painter, photographer or writer. Something you can do in your own space and time. Although I don’t know if I can paint really – I’ve never really tried…

You’re not going to have time for a while, but you should try painting, you might discover you have a hidden talent.
Yeah – I should buy an easel and a brush and start off with stick people. I’ve just bought a camera and I’m going to do some courses for that.

Is it true you were snapped up for a TV role before you went to drama school?
I got offered a job as I was auditioning, so I never actually went. When I finished the job I re-applied at RADA and LAMDA but then I got other jobs. I thought if I went to drama school for three years there would be certain parts in my younger repertoire that I’d never get to play, so I decided to just role with it instead.

So does that mean you’ve escaped all the weird and wonderful drama school warm up routines and rituals?
Oh no, I did them all at auditions. I remember one where I had to be an octopus. And one where you had to do these lines, as if you were a tree, but then you had to play someone whose dog had just died. I guess they were exercises supposed to stop you being self-conscious and see how you apply your imagination.

(read the rest of the interview at the source)

Check some beautiful outtakes from the 1883 Magazine related photoshoot:

Photoshoots > Sessions from 2015 > Session 09 [+8]
Nicole • September 19, 2015

Jenna and Peter for EW

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY – For die-hard Doctor Who fans, it can seem like a very long wait for new episodes, especially for those without a time-traveling police box at their disposal. But with the ninth season premiering this Saturday, the Doctor is nearly in. We sat down with the show’s stars Peter Capaldi (going into his second season) and Jenna Coleman (going into her third — and last) to discuss their experience scampering around the universe for another year.

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: You are filming your second season together. How’s the working relationship now?
PETER CAPALDI:
Us personally? [Sighs and rolls eyes] I can barely stand to be here with her.
JENNA COLEMAN: I knew it!
CAPALDI: Jenna’s fabulous. I always like when we get back to the TARDIS and it’s just us. We have huge adventures where gigantic things have happened, but personally I’m always most pleased when we are doing our stuff in the TARDIS.

So at this point have you fiddled with all the various buttons and levers?
COLEMAN:
I have. Peter has a system and a method. I like to press things, and Peter looks very disapprovingly at me.
CAPALDI: I’m like, “Get your hand off of that! That’s
 not what that one does!” I thought it was important 
 to have a logic to the switches, so I worked out a rough geography of what each one does. The thing about the TARDIS is that it has a telepathic and organic quality about it as well as a mechanical one.

Sure, like a Prius.
CAPALDI:
Exactly. So it has a relationship with each individual Doctor. So one can alter the purpose of a specific switch.

Would you ever ask Jenna, “How did the last guy do it?” Or is that like asking about an ex?
CAPALDI:
Pshaw! I’d never ask how to work the TARDIS. Ever. Never need to. When I first arrived, the props man very kindly showed me around the TARDIS and showed me how to operate it and I didn’t want to say, “You don’t have to show me any of this stuff, I know exactly how to drive this beast.”

What does season 9 look like for Clara and the Doctor?
COLEMAN:
They’ve become adrenaline junkies. Especially Clara. She doesn’t fear her own mortality in the same way anymore, so with that reckless abandon comes quite a lot of danger. Especially when you have two 
 similar minds without the person to say, “You guys…”
CAPALDI: I think they’re very bonded. The Doctor’s quite a tricky part to play because, if you go back to Chris Eccleston’s first episode, he says that he could see all that ever was and all that ever is and all that ever will be and that drove him mad. I took that to mean that he could see the future and the past, so he knows the fate of his companions, and that’s quite a difficult knowledge to have. So this season especially, he’s decided to enjoy what good times are available to him. You only live once, even if you’re 2,500 years old. So grab it and embrace it and hold it tight, because it’s dark outside.
COLEMAN: Scottish doom!
CAPALDI: She says I’m full of Scottish doom.

(read the rest of the interview at the source)

Nicole • September 19, 2015

USA TODAY – The socially awkward Doctor could definitely learn some social skills from actors Peter Capaldi and Jenna Coleman, who play the Doctor and his companion, Clara Oswald, respectively, on BBC America’s Doctor Who.

The co-stars chat and joke playfully on a hotel roof during a summer hotel-roof photo shoot to promote the new season (Saturday, 9 p.m. ET/PT). It will be Capaldi’s second season on the 52-year-old British sci-fi franchise and Coleman’s third and last: She confirmed to BBC Radio 1 Friday that she will be leaving the series later this season.

Clara had eroded the Doctor’s standoffish nature by late last season, and their bonding will continue on the popular series, which last season marked its biggest audience (2.2 million viewers).

“The Doctor is a great defender of mankind but he doesn’t really want to personally know that many of them,” says Capaldi. “Clara humanizes the Doctor. … His affection for Clara is very, very deep, so he listens to what she has to say.”

Coleman, who played the companion to the previous Doctor (Matt Smith), says the transition from Smith to Capaldi was smooth, aside from adjusting to the Doctor’s unique ability to regenerate into a different person and actor.

“It’s not often you have a scene where the lead actor you’re working with changes his face and person mid-scene, so that was quite an unusual day,” she says. “But we had a brilliant working relationship immediately.”

Executive producer Steven Moffat says the two had instant chemistry, which isn’t always the case. Changing actors involves risk, especially when casting a Doctor who isn’t “another quirkily handsome young man with interesting hair.”

Capaldi’s Doctor intrigues Moffat. “While he’s quite forbidding looking, there’s a sense of some emotional turbulence about him. You sort of think he’s on fire and he looks more hurtable, curiously, than David (Tennant) or Matt,” the two previous Doctors.

(read the entire article at the source)

Be sure to check these beautiful outtakes from the USA Today photoshoot featuring both Jenna and Peter!

Photoshoots > Sessions from 2015 > Session 11 [+4]
Nicole • September 14, 2015

Jenna and Peter for Radio Times

RADIO TIMES – When you get Peter Capaldi and Jenna Coleman in a room together to talk Doctor Who, the warmth and affection between them really comes through.

In the new issue of Radio Times magazine the cover stars discuss the relationship between Clara and the Doctor and how their own friendship has burgeoned during their time together on the show.

Capaldi has many kind words for his co-star, and even goes so far as to say that he’s not sure the dynamic between the Twelfth Doctor and his companion would have worked with any other actress.

“It has no equivalent in TV or fiction, a friendship between an alien creature and an extremely bright, clever and brave young woman,” says Capaldi. “It’s unusual for a man of my age to be friendly with such a youthful lady. She wants to go out into the universe and enjoy herself, happy to be reckless and in danger.

“I was so lucky it was Jenna because it might not have worked with anyone else. It’s tricky to come into a long-established show, especially as the lead, and Jenna has proved to be a wonderful actress and friend.” (source)

Magazine Scans & Clippings > Radio Times (September 19-25, 2015) [+1]
Photoshoots > Sessions from 2015 > Session 08 [+1]