Archive for the ‘Interviews’ Category
Nicole • December 08, 2017

INSTYLE US – For Jenna Coleman, playing the queen in PBS’s Masterpiece series Victoria certainly has its perks. “I’ve gotten pretty comfortable in a tiara, I suppose,” says the 31-year-old with a laugh. “But the first couple of weeks of shooting were bizarre because you step on set and suddenly you’re sat on a throne and people are curtsying.”

Royal court etiquette isn’t the only thing Coleman had to get used to for the show, which returns on January 14. Her restrictive wardrobe was also an adjustment. “After seven months of filming, I wanted to throw my corset in the bin,” she says. “You’re forced to walk around so demurely when you wear one, and I honestly don’t know how women did it. They wore so many layers too. Each dress basically has a big duvet underneath.”

That’s not to say Coleman rejects all fashion trends from Victoria. She favors baubles inspired by the queen’s namesake era—her favorite is an Annina Vogel ring, which was a gift from her family on her 30th birthday—as well as “really high collars, lacy shirts, and ruffles.” When she’s not in costume, she opts for tried-and-true Brit brands such as Burberry and Erdem, but she faces the same #petiteproblems as the 4-foot-11-inch monarch. “There’s so much that I’d love to wear, but the proportions aren’t always right,” says Coleman, who is 5 foot 2. “You really have to know what works for your frame when you’re short.”

She may be close in height to the former ruler—she even visited Buckingham Palace to see Queen Victoria’s throne, which was “so tiny, it was almost miniature”—but certain physical features separate the two. “My eyes are brown, so once I put my blue contact lenses in, that’s when I really feel like her,” says Coleman. “It’s amazing what just changing the eye color does.” She’s also grown accustomed to donning a fake baby bump. “Season 2 is about the early part of Victoria and Albert’s marriage, when their honeymoon period is interrupted by [having] many children,” she says. “She keeps getting pregnant and becomes resentful. Tension also develops because Albert wants to rule.”

Of course, Victoria’s famous moxie never allows that to happen, and some of that brio has rubbed off on Coleman. “Victoria was so impulsive and would say exactly what she thought,” says Coleman. “Playing her definitely has made me less apologetic and more assertive, but God help me if I pick up any more of her habits!” (source)

(Video) If the movie #TheHoliday gets you every time, no judgement— @Jenna_Coleman_ , too.


The InStyle photoshoot has been replaced with the HQ versions! Jenna looks great ♥_♥

Photoshoots > Sessions from 2018 > 001 – InStyle US [replaced with HQ]
Nicole • August 01, 2017

NEW YORK TIMES – Jenna Coleman, a former “Doctor Who” companion, says casting a female as the lead of the long-running sci-fi series is “genius.”

“Oh, I love it,” the actress said Monday during a Television Critics Association panel about her Masterpiece series, “Victoria.”

Earlier this month, Jodie Whittaker was announced as the 13th official incarnation of the galaxy-hopping Time Lord who travels in a time machine shaped like an old-fashioned British police telephone booth.

Coleman added that she thinks Whittaker is “brilliant and lovely” and she “can’t wait to hear” Whittaker’s voice as the character.

“It’s very exciting times,” she said.

On the BBC’s “Doctor Who,” the main character can regenerate into new bodies, allowing for endless recasting possibilities.

Coleman played a “Doctor Who” companion from 2012 to 2015. (source)

Nicole • March 02, 2017

FORBES – Speaking recently on the eve of the start of filming of season two of Masterpiece’s Victoria, Jenna Coleman, who portrays the British queen, called her a “really relatable” character.

“You meet her as a teenager, go through stages in her life, falling in love, beginning a family at the same time she had responsibilities on her shoulders,” she explained.

Coleman said season two would take place in the late 1840’s, just before the Great Exhibition of 1851 in London, the first international exhibition of manufactured products. She said it would deal with the “turbulent” relationship between Victoria and her husband, Prince Albert, the queen “trying to balance being a wife and being the queen at the same time, marital power battles.”

Season one portrayed Victoria from the time she became queen in 1837, at the age of 18, through her courtship and marriage to Prince Albert. Victoria was England’s longest-serving monarch until she was overtaken by Elizabeth II in September 2015.

Coleman said the series is filmed in an airport hangar in Leeds, Yorkshire, where the set for Buckingham Palace was built, the hangar being “the only place they could find that was big enough to hold the set. I get my hair and makeup done and then travel across the tarmac.”

The actress, who appeared as Clara, the companion of the title character in the sci-fi series, Doctor Who, called Victoria “a revelation in lots of ways. I read her diaries from when she was 18 years old. There was a kind of life in her, how frank, how candid she was—it was surprising, given her role. I found her really charming. She writes her thoughts, everything is there, she’s not hiding, not hiding from her own flaws.”

Coleman described Victoria—whom one of her ladies-in-waiting said had “veins of iron”—as “incredibly inconsistent, unbelievably stubborn. Being so obstinate is one of the greatest things about her. Stubbornness carried her through life. She survived nine births in the Victorian era, eight assassination attempts. If anything she is enduring.”

To prepare for the role, Coleman said she studied Victoria’s voluminous journals, diaries and artwork, as well biographies, comments by her contemporaries and films set in the Victorian era. She said that in addition to being “quite an accomplished artist,” Victoria also rode horses and did weaving.

And she said she agreed with the assessment of Oscar Wilde of the queen, whom he desebied as “a ruby mounted in jet” and called one of the three great personalities of the 19th century, in addition to Napoleon and the French author, Victor Hugo. (source)

Nicole • January 21, 2017

COLLIDERWhat’s it been like to take on Queen Victoria?
I’ve never played anybody real before. It’s always been fiction that you can research through a book or whatever has been adapted, but nothing that’s really happened. There’s so much to access. It’s history and it’s interesting reading from biography to biography because the voices are very different and it can be so subjective. I just read a range. (Show Creator) Daisy [Goodwin ] gave me a bit list of stuff to read, to try to get an idea of her character.

Can you imagine what it must have been like to be in a position like this while being so young? That must have been so crazy!
Daisy was having a conversation with her daughter and turned around and looked at her and thought, “Wow, could you imagine if you became the most powerful woman in the room tomorrow? You’re a teenager!” The thing about Victoria is that she was extremely obstinate and stubborn, by all accounts. Lord Melbourne said, “The Queen only tends to think forwards. Once she’s made up her mind, there is no unearthly power that will make her go ‘round.” It’s that stubbornness and that will that made her who she was. Otherwise, being an 18-year-old in that position, I can’t begin to imagine. She’d never really spent any time by herself or spent a night in a room by herself or had been in a room alone with a man before, and she was becoming the most powerful woman in the world and had to navigate Parliament. When you put it into context, it is an extraordinary story.

Do you think the fact that she didn’t seem to know or care about how she was supposed to behave is what helped people like her?
Yeah, and it’s one of the things I love most about her. None of the way she’s supposed to behave and the uniform of her life has squashed her lust for life, regardless of growing up in the Kensington system. I find that really amazing about her. Also, she’s so unapologetically herself. She’s flawed, in that way, but I think it’s what makes her really human. It’s really interesting to play because she’s so inconsistent. She’s so many things. She can be quite childish and frivolous, at times, and emotional, but other times, she’s like the wisest person in the world, way above her years. She was tempestuous and she was known for violent outbursts when she was younger, but she was incredibly romantic and with a big heart. She was very loyal to her servants. She was such a multitude of things, so trying to play that inconsistency of her character and also be unapologetically flawed yet likeable has been interesting to navigate. It’s all really, really fun to play. I keep watching Judi Dench’s Mrs. Brown. That’s what Daisy said she thinks is the most accurate performance of the Victoria she has studied and read. It’s interesting to think, “Okay, that’s the Victoria in 40 years time. That’s where we’re headed.” That way, you can get the essence, but she’s a lot younger and she’s very vibrant. She’s been through a lot, but you can see where she’s headed to, in a way.

Did it ever get totally overwhelming playing someone like this, especially with all of the emotional ups and downs?
Yeah. I always want more time. You want more time to shoot, but you have to just roll with the punches. You do as much prep as you can, and then you throw it all away, get on set, and see what happens and what the other actors bring ‘cause that changes everything. You get as prepared as you can be, but then you have to be willing to fuck it all up. Peter Capaldi probably taught me that the most. You just want to keep it alive, and hopefully, if you’ve prepped well enough, that’s there. It’s interesting because there’s such growth in this series. We really start at a place where she’s really, really young and really vulnerable and uncertain, and then we really see her grow into Queen and that role of command. You’ll see her fall in love and go through the coronation, and get pregnant and become a mother. The arc of the series is one of huge growth, and of becoming more and more Victoria, as we go on.

What was it like for you to go from fighting aliens to ruling a kingdom? Did it feel equally daunting?
It’s just different ways of working. It’s interesting, working on the voice was something I felt a lot of pressure on, in particular. It’s trying to get the sense of someone who’s younger yet regal, and that doesn’t distance, but is really accessible. I thought Emily Blunt did an amazing job in Young Victoria. There wasn’t really a day on set that wasn’t huge. You’ve got these journals that she’s written in, that tell you how she felt on the day. It just felt like you could shoot it as a feature film, but we were shooting in for TV, and we just wanted to get the detail. There is so much detail and you move through it all so fast. There’s so much wealth in all of the moment and you want to capture that.

What was it like to put on the clothes and the contacts, be on these sets, and have people call you, “Your Majesty”?
Alastair Bruce, who worked on Downton Abbey a lot, comes in and talks about protocol, and he was like, “Look, when you’re in a position like this, you never play the power. It’s just inherent that it’s there. It’s about the way people respond to you, rather than you trying to project a certain status.” I think that, if you have that status, you don’t need to. He was really useful. He said, “It’s the people around you that make you Queen by their reaction to you, but you’ve got nothing to prove.” She’s an inexperienced 18-year-old girl, going through everything that an 18-year-old girl goes through, at the same time that you’re navigating ruling and being the most powerful woman in the world. She was 4’11” and 18 years old, and so openly passionate. It’s fascinating.

Did you ever put yourself in her shoes and wonder if you could have stepped into a role like that, at 18 years old?
Yeah, and the answer is resolutely no. Her mother told her that she had to sign a regency to give up her power until she turned 21, and she just said no. She was about to become the Queen of England and her mother was telling her to do this, and she said no. She was a force of nature, and she remained that way. People just see these images of her, but by all accounts, she loved to laugh. Her humor was so apparent. She was very sociable, she had a love of opera and music, and she used to paint all of the dramatic scenes of the opera. It really captured her imagination.

You were one of the longest running Companions on Doctor Who. What was that experience like for you? Do you feel like it really made you grow, as an actor?
Yeah, it really did. It’s such a different way of working. It’s such a unique show and a unique beast, in itself. Every two weeks, it’s so different, and you’re playing an over-arching character. It’s the relationships with Matt [Smith] and Peter [Capaldi] that made that job everything that it is, and what they taught me, as actors. They’re so uniquely wonderful and really amazing friends. I think I was very lucky to have fallen into the hands of both of them, and we’re really good friends today. (source)

Nicole • January 17, 2017

MARIE CLAIREThere’s a Reason the Chemistry Between Victoria and Albert Is So…
“We’re friends in real life and had been for years. We already had a good working relationship. We both really researched our characters, and both had similar ideas. It’s just easy.”

Victoria and Albert Really Were Bodice-Ripping Levels of In Love
“The love between them was so strong. Things like the scene in the ballroom when he rips his shirt so he can put the flower in. All of that’s real, it actually happened. There are diaries–it’s all there. It was very important to get their passion.”

Yes, There’s a Season Two, and Yes, It’ll Be Even More Passionate
“Going into Season Two next year, they have huge arguments. They were an incredibly tumultuous couple, yet they loved each other fiercely. That’s going to be incredibly fun to play in 2017. But Victoria was incredibly romantic—she loved romance.”

Victoria and Albert’s Wedding Night Is Passionate—and Based on #Facts
“There is an account of their wedding night where Victoria writes how Albert beheld her in kisses, and how it was the most heavenly night she’s ever spent, and how she’s the luckiest woman in the world—that this angel of a man could possibly adore her. She’s really candid. They stay in the same bed together, and in the morning he puts her stockings on. It’s first love and she’s brimming with it.”

All the Costumes Are Genius, But Jenna Coleman Has a Feminist Favorite
“The riding outfit—when she and Albert go running in the forest. It’s navy with a red collar. There’s something quite masculine about it: it’s the same as the men’s uniform, but she has a big skirt. There are so many military jackets out this season, so it’s amazing to see fashion harkening back.”

Behind-the-Scenes of the Show = Wayyyyyy Less Glamorous
“Maneuvering in and out of cars is hilarious, and I’ve often got a backpack on. It’s really cold so you arrive in this beautiful gown, but you have a rucksack on, and a crown, and a coat, and you’re trying to navigate your way. It’s quite hilarious. Definitely less elegant off screen. Often, you’ve got wellies hidden underneath the costume!”

And Finally, Here Are Two Truths and a Lie About Next Season….
“There may be a return of a very popular character. There will be numerous births. And there may also be numerous deaths. Very opaque. Very opaque. Oh, and perhaps the invention of the Christmas tree….”

(source)