Archive for the ‘Photoshoot’ Category

Jenna is featured in the Autumn 2017 issue of Town and Country UK, with an amazing brand new photoshoot (this magazine have the best ones, always!) The issue is going to be on sale from August 24, be sure to keep the site and twitter @JennaColemanCom checked for HQ scans and outtakes! In the meantime enjoy this preview and a piece of her interview for the magazine!

TOWN AND COUNTRY UK – As the former companion to Dr Who, Jenna Coleman is no stranger to adoring fans. Since taking on the role of Queen Victoria in ITV’s drama, she has found these interactions have a different tone: her interlocutors tend to be rather more respectful these days. Indeed, she reveals with a laugh, one dropped a curtsey before asking: “Your Majesty, please can I get a selfie?”

And I, too, find myself leaping anxiously to my feet when I spot Coleman advancing through the Sunday-morning strollers in Clissold Park, and am taken aback when she offers to go into the café herself to order our drinks.

Tiny – just over five feet tall – and dainty, Coleman has a doe-eyed prettiness that makes her seem far younger than her 31 years, and a slight but distinct Lancashire accent. Despite this, and her casual attire (vintage jacket with missing buttons, jeans, bulging rucksack), there is a definite formality and dignity about her manner, honed, no doubt, by months of playing a monarch. Majesty, whether on- or off-screen, weaves a spell that nothing else can match. Perhaps it’s not surprising: are we not, after all, taught from childhood by the most famous fairy tales – Snow White, Sleeping Beauty, Cinderella – that Royalty is quasi-magical, princesses dazzlingly beautiful, princes charming, kings and queens rich beyond the dreams of avarice…? When those fairy tales appear to come true, as embodied by Diana, Princess of Wales, or, latterly, the Duchess of Cambridge, it is no wonder that a national obsession is born.

In his seminal work The English Constitution, published in 1867 when Victoria ruled the waves, the essayist Walter Bagehot mused: “The mystic reverence, the religious allegiance, which are essential to a true monarchy, are imaginative sentiments that no legislature can manufacture in any people.” It must be a source of enormous frustration to committed republicans that, while the idea of a hereditary head of state is undoubtedly illogical, even indefensible, it remains so popular. Poll after poll sees the British public favouring the status quo by a margin of over three to one. In fact, there are few political questions on which we are more united.

Latterly, this inexhaustible fascination with the monarchy has been profitably mined for entertainment. The eagerly anticipated second season of The Crown, Netflix’s lavish dramatisation of the current Queen’s life and reign, is released in November. Meanwhile, the new series of Victoria begins in September, and follows the Queen as she attempts to reconcile her duties as a mother and wife with those of a monarch, in the struggle to “have it all” that continues to exercise successful career women to this day. Hence, says Victoria’s creator Daisy Goodwin, the series’ appeal to an unexpectedly high proportion of millennial women. “A young woman is in charge, is the motor of the show rather than the love interest. And this is a teenager who is the most powerful woman in the world,” she points out. “It’s a very subversive show in a way that people don’t realise; it’s profoundly feminist. I didn’t come to it with a political purpose, but it’s obviously there.”

This may seem a little ironic, given that Victoria was famous for opposing women’s suffrage and refusing to contemplate the existence of lesbianism. “But having a woman at the helm does change people’s perception of women in society, so Victoria had a huge influence on her time,” says Goodwin. “I recently did a debate with Philippa Gregory on Victoria versus Elizabeth I, and, while basically Elizabeth had more power, her way to rule was to pretend to be a man. What is so gripping about Victoria is that she doesn’t do that. With no apologies, she is a woman, she’s in control, she has all the money, and she’s not waiting for Mr Darcy to propose – she does it herself. And she never apologises, never explains, she doesn’t have self-doubt. None of that “I’m not pretty enough, I’m not clever enough.’ She has a very strong sense of her destiny. That’s what makes her an interesting role model.” (source)

Magazine Scans & Clippings > Town and Country UK (Autumn 2017) [+1]
Photoshoots > Sessions from 2017 > 002 – Town and Country UK [+2]
Nicole   /   04.09.2017   •  

Jenna is featured in the latest issue (May) of British Vogue with a beautiful and very regal new photoshoot.
She ever looks so amazing! The scan from the magazine together with the solo outtake have now been added to the gallery, enjoy!

And remember the Jenna’s 31 Birthday Project! Jenna’s birthday is in 18 days, be sure to contribute for a very good cause!

Nicole   /   12.02.2016   •  

HARPER’S BAZAAR UKCan you tell us a little bit about Shop Small and the role you play in helping small businesses?
I’m supporting Amex’s Shop Small campaign to encourage people to ‘shop small’ in the lead-up to Christmas in particular. And helping to shine a light on some my favourite independent shops.

Why do you think Small Business Saturday is such an important cause to support?
I think it’s important to encourage the creativity and individualism that small shops offer. I love to spend my Saturdays stumbling across a new independent store and finding an upcoming designer to offer something new for the home or for an individual gift. Also, the personal customer service, in your local coffee shop for example. I think variety and individualism is the key and one of things I adore so much about living in London.

How would you encourage people to support small businesses in their everyday lives?
It’s all about discovery, and finding those smaller, one-of-a-kind shops and taking enjoyment from it. It’s simple. I’ve really enjoyed sharing my tips and ‘finds’.

What was the first record you ever bought?
Cher, ‘The Shoop Shoop Song’ or Johnny Nash, ‘I Can See Clearly Now’.

What is your favourite film?
Hardest question ever, but I love classics like Bringing Up Baby, Betty Blue and Little White Lies. I am a big fan of Damien Chazelle too.

What do you have an irrational fear of?
Rollercoasters. Ironic after growing up in Blackpool.

What is your favourite childhood book?
Black Beauty strikes a chord. Alongside Enid Blyton’s The Wishing-Chair.

What is your signature dance move?
All about the hands. And a slight hip bob.

What surprises people about you?
That I am indeed of Scottish/English descent

Who was the first actress you were inspired by?
Maxine Peake at the Royal Exchange Theatre in Manchester, where I used to go on school trips.

What was a book that changed your life?
East of Eden, I remember reading the section about ‘Thou Mayest’ and finding it pretty profound wherever I was in my life at that point. Recently, I adored Donna Tartt’s Goldfinch, it felt very ‘big’.

What is the best piece of advice you’ve ever been given?
I was in Bali with a taxi driver and he was trying to explain his life philosophy through a language barrier and it came out as “making easy”. I love the simplicity of this. I also read a Ricky Gervais quote on Instagram today which was: “No one else knows that they’re doing either”, which gives me immense comfort.

What are you most proud of?
I am proud that all my girlfriends from school have maintained such close friendships for 16 years now, through school, university, moving to London, working in totally different fields, life moving in different directions and now entering our 30s together.

What are the skincare products you can’t live without?
Bioderma, Su-Man toner, Linda Meredith Q3, Sisley Black Rose mask, [which is] especially good for a flight.

What is your signature scent?
Acqua di Parma Ginepro Di Sardegna.

What is the best beauty tip you’ve ever been given?
Ice your face for two minutes after cleansing – the cheapest and most powerful trick. It also wakes you up.

How do you keep in shape?
I really believe in functional medicine and try to put a lot of vitamins into my body. I switch between yoga and jogging, As of recent, a bit of horse-riding too. 


Who is your beauty icon?
Keira Knightley. I think she has such a Romantic grace about her. (source)

Photoshoots > Sessions from 2016 > Session 09 [+2]
Nicole   /   11.25.2016   •  

HUFFINGTON POST UK – For the latest in our WISE WORDS interview series – where stars from a whole range of fields share the important life lessons they’ve learned along the way – we’re posing some of the big questions to JENNA COLEMAN.

Following her roles in ‘Emmerdale’ and ‘Waterloo Road’, Jenna broke through as one of Doctor Who’s most popular ever companions Clara Oswald.

Since then, she’s taken the title role as the young Queen in the ITV drama ‘Victoria’. In her capacity as an ambassador for American Express Shop Small, she spoke to HuffPostUK about what she’s learned along the way, and why her family would never let her get away with any queenliness herself…

How do you switch off from the world?
I take a bath. Or I read. Or both at once. Sometimes I go for a long walk.

How do you deal with negativity that comes your way?
If it’s justified, I’ll have a think, I try to take it on board. Sometimes it takes a phone call to my mum to rationalise. She’ll tell me, ‘Chin up.’ I do try to learn something from it.

When and where are you at your happiest?
I love being on an aeroplane. It means I can switch off, but I also like the switching of environments. There’s something about being in the clouds.

I also like being around my school-friends in London. It brings me back to who I’ve always been. They’re very supportive of my work, but they don’t let me take myself too seriously.

What has been the best piece of advice you’ve received?
I was in Bali, and I was struggling to communicate with my taxi driver, we had a language barrier. But we ploughed on, and he was trying to explain some philosophy, and he came up with ‘Making easy.’ And I’ve always remembered it.

What has been the hardest lesson you’ve had to learn?
You can’t fix everything.

What would you tell your 13-year-old self?
Don’t worry so much; Have more faith in yourself and your instincts; Don’t try so hard to fit in.

What three things are at the top of your to-do list?
Learn the piano; Learn French; Get better at photography.

What do you think happens when we die?
After watching ‘Black Mirror’, I’d want to ask Charlie Brooker. I’d like we think we go to some special place, but maybe we just come back as grass.

When do you feel in the presence of something bigger than ourselves?
When we look at the Supermoon, or we’re anywhere where we look up and see the stars.

What quality do you most treasure in relationships?
Unconditional love, when you’re doing something for another person without expecting a reward.

What keeps you grounded?
Northern pragmatism and humour. I can just see my family’s face if I went home and tried to indulge in some queenliness a la Victoria. I wouldn’t last long.

What the most recent act of kindness you received?
I got into a cab, and I told the driver ‘I’m having such a bad day.’ And he thought I said ‘It’s my birthday’ so he proceeded to sing Happy Birthday to me, the whole song. I didn’t have the heart to stop him, and it actually cheered me up a lot.

(source)

Nicole   /   10.27.2016   •  

Updated the gallery adding new outtakes from The Guardian photoshoot – from few months ago – and replaced the ones we already had with HQs. Big thanks to my friend Emily for them!

Be sure to check them in our gallery! And please, credit if repost :)

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Photoshoots > Sessions from 2016 > Session 05 [+3 and replaced the others]